Barry Newman's Blog

March 29, 2010

“The Heart” in the Septuagint (part II)

Filed under: The Heart — barrynewman @ 9:49 pm

Results

Table 1 indicates the numbers and percentages where, in the Septuagint textual material equivalent to the Hebrew text is omitted; kardia, its cognates or compound words derived from kardia are used substantially in lev/levav of the Hebrew text; no Greek word occurs in the place of lev/levav but texts have a similar meaning; dianoia, psuche, phren/phroneo and nous or their cognates are used substantially in place of lev/levav with both texts having essentially the same meaning; other words are used substantially in place of lev/levav with both texts having much the same meaning;  the texts having essentially different understandings.

Matter in the Greek text in the place of lev/levav of the Hebrew text  Number of Occurrences % of all instances present in the Hebrew[i] (% of instances present in the Greek[ii])
Textual material absent from the Greek text  13  1.5 (not applicable)
Kardia, cognates and derived compound words  702  82.0 (83.3)
No Greek word but the meaning similar  36  4.2 (4.3)
Dianoia and the meaning similar  33  3.9 (3.9)
Psuche and the meaning similar  25  2.9 (3.0)
Phren/phroneo and the meaning similar  7  0.8 (0.8)
Nous and the meaning similar  6  0.7 (0.7)
Other Greek words and the meaning similar  25  2.9 (3.0)
The texts contain different understandings  9  1.1 (1.1)

 

                                                        Table 1


[i] The number of occurrences of lev/levav ascertained to be occur in the Masoretic text was 856.  The percentage is based on this figure as the total.

[ii] The number of instances where the textual material was present in the Hebrew text but absent from the Greek text was 13. The percentage in parentheses is based on the figure 843 (856 – 13).

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