Barry Newman's Blog

June 28, 2012

The Gospel and its Proclamation (part XV)

Filed under: Proclaiming the gospel,The Gospel — barrynewman @ 11:10 pm

The active forms

A brief comment should be made on the two active forms derived from “euaggelizo”. One text has already been referred to above – Rev 14: 6.  The other (Rev 10: 7) occurs in a reference to the mystery of God that he had proclaimed to his servants the prophets. Like the usage in Rev 14: 16, translations simply refer to “proclaiming” rather than “proclaiming the good news”.  The reference to “proclaiming” alone is deemed to be sufficient. In one case, the presence of the noun “euaggelion” is sufficient for the notion of “good news” to be evident.  In the other case, “the mystery of God” is what is being announced.  That the active voice is used in both instances may be partly a reflection of there being no need to refer to any other object of the verb, or it may simply reflect an idiosyncratic choice by the author.

The passive forms

The occurrence in Gal 1: 11 has already been mentioned – “the good news announced by me”. The two instances in 1 Peter translate: “The word of the Lord abides forever and this is the word, the good news announced to you” (1: 25) and “For this is also why the good news was announced to the dead” (4: 6). The other two cases are found in Hebrews: “For we also have had the good news announced to us just as to them” (Heb 4: 2) and “Those who formerly had the good news announced (to them) failed to enter because of disobedience” (Heb 4: 6).  From the point of view of the English language, each of these instances is indeed in the passive voice.  In the last three instances “good news” is probably not the most appropriate rendering.  Something like, “great news” or even “great declaration” may be more suitable.

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